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The Democratic Party's Last Chance

A Commentary By Ted Rall

Friday, December 16, 2016

Democrats need to stop grasping at straws.

Shocked by Trump's win and dismayed at his half billionaire, half military junta cabinet, liberals are thrashing about in the stinking waters of dying American democracy, hoping against hope for something -- anything -- to stop Trump from becoming president.

Some Dems point to the CIA allegation that the president-elect received an assist, via WikiLeaks, from Russian government hackers. If this could proved, they ask, especially if Trump knowingly colluded with Vladimir Putin's tech-savvy underlings to deny Hillary Clinton her God-intended victory, wouldn't that force him to step aside?

Sorry, my liberal friends: that deus won't ex machina.

First, the intelligence community hasn't presented a shred of evidence, much less proof, that the Russians hacked the DNC. When Trump scoffed that the wise men of U.S. intelligence were the same geniuses who gave us the Iraq War, he had a point. The spooks are discredited. No proof, no scandal. Even if there were proof, who would force Trump back to his Tower? Not the Republican congressmen and senators wallowing in the surprise win they handed him. No GOP leaders behind it, no impeachment.

Then there's the mother of all Hail Mary passes: trying to convince roughly 40 members of the Electoral College pledged to Trump to vote for Hillary instead. This, courtesy of Michael Moore et al., is much discussed in liberal circles. But this idea is one doomed to failure. Electors are hacks slavishly devoted to their parties. It's much too much to ask them to turn "faithless" in support of a coup, to undermine democracy in support of a candidate whose approval ratings never climbed above (tied for) "most unpopular ever."

There are only two realistic ways to get rid of President Trump: street protests and Democratic intransigence.

A sustained campaign of national street protests might make it so impossible for him to govern that he might lose support among influential Republican leaders, especially those from blue states.

Of course, Trump might order his cops and soldiers to shoot the protesters. That's what China did to the students at Tiananmen Square, a crackdown of which Trump approved: "Then [the Chinese authorities] were vicious, they were horrible, but they put it down with strength. That shows you the power of strength."

Things may and probably will change. However, I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for a mass uprising a la Paris May 1968. There's no party or group capable of mass organizing in the United States, much less a radical leftist front -- which is what such a militant mobilization would require.

Protests are boring. It rains and snows. Cops are scary.

This is why the anti-Trump protests following Election Day petered out in less than a week, and why the January 21 Million Women March is likely to impress for a day, then be forgotten.

Our best chance to stop or slow down Trump lies with Democratic legislators in the House and Senate.

To a man, Trump's cabinet picks are morally objectionable, ideologically unacceptable and objectively unqualified: a climate denialist to the run the EPA, an idiot at HUD, a general (one of several) for the DOD who wants Congress to change a law mandating civilian rule, the CEO of ExxonMobil as Secretary of State.

Democrats should say "you're fired!" to every last one of them.

And they can. Thanks to Harry Reid, the filibuster rule is no more, so Republicans can approve these guys with a simple majority. But any Democratic Senator may put a secret personal hold on a presidential appointee. That's exactly what Democrats should do. And that's what we ought to demand. Let Trump go back to LinkedIn to find better-qualified nominees.

Democrats should demand special prosecutors to look into Trump's tax returns and the brazen conflicts of interest between his real estate business and his duties as president. Tie the bastard up with endless hearings, just like the GOP did with the Monica Lewinsky scandal and Benghazi.

Since Trumpism presents a grave and present danger to the republic, no Democratic legislator ought to negotiate with Republicans or vote for any Republican-sponsored bills. Yes, that counts the stuff Democrats might actually like, such as building new infrastructure. If the GOP wants it, the answer is no. Always. No matter what.

You don't "find common ground with" or "cooperate with" or "reach out to" a tyrant-in-waiting. Which, after the next terrorist attack or other security threat, is exactly what Trump will expose himself to be. Faced with incipient evil you stand firm, united in your conviction that everything that tyrant-in-waiting stands for is evil and un-American.

You block everything they want. You become the biggest party of no parliamentary democracy has ever known. Because even if you're not sure it's the right thing to do, it's smart.

Disgusted and now dominant, the Bernie Sanders wing of the Democratic Party is 10 seconds from bolting. Democrats have one last chance to act like Democrats -- or watch their party come apart at the seams.

Nonresistance is futile.

Ted Rall is author of "Trump: A Graphic Biography," an examination of the life of the Republican presidential nominee in comics form. You can support Ted's hard-hitting political cartoons and columns and see his work first by sponsoring his work on Patreon.

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